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Resonantia Exhibition

Mon 1 Feb – Sat 2 April | 10am – 4.30pm | Mon – Fri| Free Admission

 

Our first exhibition of the year features two local artists Edy Gosselin and Rachel Hardy Moody.

Edy Gosselin
“My paintings have over the years evolved from the highly literal to intuitive mark making and colourfield formality. The shift in my approach reflects the kaleidoscope of a life rich in experience and focus. The current atmospheric ‘scapes’ are distilled and deconstructed allowing the viewer to feel secure in the structure but rested in the lyrical language.”

http://www.edygosselin.co.uk/

Rachel Hardy Moody
“My interest in the subconscious and imprinted memory also play a huge part in my work. I admire the work of Anselm Kiefer who draws out the very soul from place and landscape. Our past with deep hidden memories, ruins of our own and other’s lives. Like Kiefer’s work, memories that are with us are never far from the surgace, a surface beauty under which darker truths lie.”

http://www.hardymoody.co.uk/rachel-hardy-moody/

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What’s On JANUARY

January sees us broken back in with largely school productions; Park House, Trinity and The Downes will all be exhibiting dance, music and drama across the month.

On Friday 29th Jan the season gets going with gusto – The Kast Off Kinks are not a tribute band, they are made up exclusively of former The Kinks members. The line up has consisted of pretty much every member of The Kinks there’s ever been (including Ray Davies himself) and currently sees Mick Avory, Ian Gibbons, John Dalton and Dave Clarke belting out all the classic.

Tickets can be booked by click here, or you can call us on 01635 244 246 (Between 10am-4.30pm, Mon-Fri) or email us a reservation request at boxoffice@arlingtonarts.co.uk.

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Interview with The Rails

Kami Thompson & James Walbourne took some time out to answer some questions about their experiences as BBC Folk Award Horizon Award winning band – The Rails. They’ll be playing Arlington Arts Centre on Friday 2nd October 2015.

“Fair Warning” combines the traditional and contemporary, do you have a vision of how folk might continue to develop?

Folk is developing all the time. It’s in everything from Grime to top 40. It’s all just telling a story. In terms of ‘traditional folk’, i’m not sure. A lot of it is extremely twee these days and not to our tastes. You still have the Eliza Carthy’s of this world pushing the envelope though.

Island’s Pink Label handled arguably some of the most formative folk acts of the 60’s and 70’s (Nick Drake, Fairport Convention, John Martyn). Do you feel any particular pressures or expectations as the first artists on this newly resurrected label?

No. It’s just a label.

You both seem to have been exceptionally musical from a young age, did either of you ever consider, however fleetingly, a career outside of music?

James – Never.

Kami – I consider my options daily.

Do you feel the comparisons drawn between The Rails and Kami’s parents are accurate, or inevitable?

We set out wanting to make a classic sounding folk rock record so it was inevitable, really. It’s as much a pop record as it is a folk record – much like Kami’s parents, I think.

What about your family James – are there many creative types to be found there?

My dad was a major influence. He doesn’t play a musical instrument but took me to see everyone from Frank Sinatra to Stevie Ray Vaughan  when I was a kid. I attended more gigs than days at school. My brother is also a great all rounder and has played with me for many years.

Speaking of family, your support act is Zak Hobbs – Kami’s nephew- could you tell us a

Zak Hobbs
Zak Hobbs

little bit about his style?

Sort of barber shop Raga…..no not really. He’s a great guitar player – definitely one to watch. He’s sort of in the mould of Bert Jansch and the 60’s guys. You saw him here first!

Thankyou, Kami + James!

Tickets to see The Rails are £12 and can be brought via the Box Office on 01635 244 246, or by clicking here.

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A harrowing night out…

Most shows aren’t sold on the basis of being “harrowing” but Badac Theatre Company  are unlikely to let a little thing like unsettling their audience get in the way of a quality production. They have an aim, and that aim is to explore not just what human rights abuses are, but what they mean to the individual.

The show Badac are bringing to Arlington on Thursday 24th September is The Flood. Presenting the tale of a love affair between a WW1 soldier and nurse, all things vicious, visceral and banal are brought to life through an assault on the senses in the style of Antonin Artaud.

artaudEmerging from the surrealist movement of the 1930s Artaud included sound, light and smell not just as add-ons to his scripts but as a constant and often overwhelming integral part.  Artaud’s written theories were not always easy to translate to performance, which is largely why his fascinating school of thought has not been explored as much as it should have been in the years since his death. With over a decade of experience under their belts, Badac stage his concept with beautiful simplicity; the countless soldiers injured on the frontline are rendered by bloody pieces of not-so-fresh meat which are (literally) hurled into the fray, machine gun fire is replicated by an incessantly chopping knife and so on.

Once you have an understanding of their approach (which they term “theatre of cruelty”) what is  gained from performances like these? Surreal – yes, intense- sure, but also enlightening and, many find, a way of unburdening the subconscious. The intention is not to be sadistic or gratuitous, but to stimulate honest reactions from the audience.  This is not a frivolous evening out to the theatre, we’re happy to make that clear. You won’t come away with a fleeting joie de vivre – but bewilderment and adrenaline are a heady cocktail.

Please note: As this is a site specific piece in Arlington Manor Cellar, the performance will only be accessible via a flight of stairs. Arlington Manor Cellar can become quite damp, so we would recommend dressing with this in mind.

Tickets can be booked here or via 01635 244 246 between 10am-4.30pm, Monday to Friday.

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What’s On SEPTEMBER

Kicking off the season with a couple of great genre twisters on the music side of things, and theatre to make the soul shudder.

SALLY BARKER is the voice from the Voice. The one that brought Sir Tom Jones to tears. Back in 2014 Sally came a sensational second place in the BBC’s televised competition. After such a successful run, it might come as a surprise to find out that Sally turned down a record deal with Universal – but as an avid & award-winning songwriter Sally was never going to be happy tied to only producing covers. That said, her set at Arlington will feature favourites from the show such as Olly Murs’s “Dear Darlin’” as well as her own folk-blues-rock originals. Friday 18th September 8pm, tickets are £15.

BENDRIX is Benji Kirkpatrick and his folk instrumental covers of Jimi Hendrix’s work. You’ll know Benji best from folk supergroup Bellowhead, and he’s long been sneaking Hendrix songs into his solo sets. He’s now received Arts Council funding to develop this Hendrix project, in which he strips back the psychedelia of the age to reveal the raw greatness of the songs underneath. Played on a whole range of string instruments including bouzouki, banjo and mandolin this will also include Benji’s own originals. Wednesday 23rd September 8pm, tickets are £12.

Badac Theatre take over Arlington Manor cellar with THE FLOOD. This site-specific piece set in WW1 follows the intensely building relationship between a frontline soldier and a nurse, highlighting through correspondence and snatched private moments the brutality of their existence, the banality of war and the immediacy of death. Badac take an approach
they term “Theatre of Violence”, in which they aim to make their work an extreme experience for both the audience and actors. Thursday 24th September 6pm & 8pm, tickets are £12 (Concessions £10). Please note this performance is only accessible via a flight of stairs.

Chris White plays some of the most famous saxophone solos from his time with Dire Straits and recounts stories from his life as a musician with artists such as Paul McCartney, Joe Cocker, Robbie Williams, Ray Charles and of course, Dire Straits, which included performing at the legendary Live Aid and Mandela concerts. A master of rock’n’roll, blues and pop. Saturday 6th September 8pm, tickets are £14.50

Tickets for all of these shows can be purchased here or over the phone on 01635 244 246. General opening hours are 10am-4.30pm Mon-Fri, or later on performance days.

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45th Anniversary of Hendrix’s Death Honoured by Strings Legend

2015 marks the 45th anniversary of the death of the late, great Jimi Hendrix. Widely regarded as one of the most influential guitarists of the century and often cited as the “Voice of a Generation”, he started playing an actual guitar bought for him by his father for $5 at 15 years old, graduating from years of dreaming on the family broom. After a stint in the army (cut short when Jimi was injured during a parachute jump) he committed to the electric guitar full time. What must’ve seemed like bad luck for Jimi, was world changing for the music industry. Within months of scoring his first manager, Jimi had 3 UK Top Ten hits under his belt and was well on his way to becoming one of the most legendary musicians of, well, ever.

After just four years as a global super star, Jimi Hendrix died of asphyxiation caused by an overdose of sleeping pills in September of 1970. Forty-five years later and tributes to the electric guitar legend come in all shapes and forms – from a sea of Hendrix masks at the Isle of Wight festival, to a poignant retelling of his work from folk aficionado Benji Kirkpatrick.

Sara Lincoln Photography
Sara Lincoln Photography

Benji (of folk supergroups Bellowhead and Faustus) is a long term fan of Hendrix, his music leading Benji to the electric guitar which really solidified his passion for playing. Odd then, perhaps, that Benji leaves the instrument behind in his interpretation of the hits of Hendrix. Hendrix’s performances were well known for fusing feedback, fuzz and distortion – something you won’t find in Benji’s angle as he sticks to acoustic bouzouki, banjo and mandolin. It’s not a case of “Benji knows better”, this stripping down is done to reveal the genius of the songs beneath. Despite (or because of?) not being able to read or write music Hendrix was a fantastically intricate songwriter, and Bendrix is all about showcasing this.

You can catch the show at Arlington Arts on Wednesday 23rd September at 8pm. Tickets are £12 and can be purchased here, or via the box office on 01635 244 246 between 10-4.30pm, Monday to Friday. All profits go to Mary Hare School for the Deaf.